Buy Link: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Danube-Street-Linda-Tweedie-ebook/dp/B07D7KH8PC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1527507776&sr=8-1&keywords=danube+street

Synopsis
From the authors of the bestselling Coyle Trilogy comes a fantastic new title.

Danube Street tells the tale of notorious Madame, Stella Gold, and her mission to turn the infamous number 17 Danube St into Edinburgh’s most exclusive brothel.

The house, situated in one of Edinburgh’s most exclusive streets, was known the length and breadth of the country; a magnet for red-blooded males, single or otherwise. Danube Street was always the first port of call when Merchant or Naval ships docked in Leith, and was the attraction, never to be missed by visiting clergymen of every denomination.

Stella Gold began life far from the bright lights of the city. Born Agnes McLeod, she was reared in the wilds of Ayrshire. The only daughter of a tenant farmer, she endured a harsh, rugged upbringing. Now, although the darling of Edinburgh’s glitterati, she finds herself the victim of a vendetta by the city’s most dangerous and violent criminal brothers,and a corrupt Chief of Police.

Survival was a constant challenge which Stella thought she had under control. How wrong could she be?

Guest Post

Hamish Ross

There are many complex characters in Danube Street and none more so than Hamish Ross. Both of us agree he is one of the most interesting.

On completion of the first draft we were advised to all but write him out. He was considered incidental to the plot and his background story totally unnecessary.

As two fairly novice authors we bowed to more superior experience and did what was suggested. This was a big mistake in our opinion. After a rewrite Hamish Ross resurfaced and possibly with a greater influence on the story ine.

He was born to a ‘Hellfire and Brimstone’, dour, Scottish minister and his cold-hearted, strict wife. She despised her brute of a husband and abhorred the weekly rituals he subjected her to which resulted in the birth of their son.

During the early years Hamish was discouraged from with other children who tormented the strange little boy at every opportunity. He was completely ostracised and grew into a lonely, sad, little boy. As the Jesuits say “give me the boy till he’s seven and I will show you the man.” This was certainly the case with Hamish Ross.

At the age of twelve he left the confines of his island home to attend school on the mainland, as did all the other children. Having spent most of his early years on his own he didn’t suffer homesickness like the other kids. He took great pleasure in extracting revenge on his tormentors.

Despite his father’s insistence that he enter the ministry Hamish had very different ideas and at the age of eighteen, against his parents wishes, enrolled in Police College.

College life was not what the young man expected, once again he became the butt of his classmates’ jokes. He was left out at every opportunity and it was at this time Hamish began hearing “The Voices” and the murders began.

Synopsis
From the authors of the bestselling Coyle Trilogy comes a fantastic new title.

Danube Street tells the tale of notorious Madame, Stella Gold, and her mission to turn the infamous number 17 Danube St into Edinburgh’s most exclusive brothel.

The house, situated in one of Edinburgh’s most exclusive streets, was known the length and breadth of the country; a magnet for red-blooded males, single or otherwise. Danube Street was always the first port of call when Merchant or Naval ships docked in Leith, and was the attraction, never to be missed by visiting clergymen of every denomination.

Stella Gold began life far from the bright lights of the city. Born Agnes McLeod, she was reared in the wilds of Ayrshire. The only daughter of a tenant farmer, she endured a harsh, rugged upbringing. Now, although the darling of Edinburgh’s glitterati, she finds herself the victim of a vendetta by the city’s most dangerous and violent criminal brothers,and a corrupt Chief of Police.

Survival was a constant challenge which Stella thought she had under control. How wrong could she be?

Guest Post

Hamish Ross

There are many complex characters in Danube Street and none more so than Hamish Ross. Both of us agree he is one of the most interesting.

On completion of the first draft we were advised to all but write him out. He was considered incidental to the plot and his background story totally unnecessary.

As two fairly novice authors we bowed to more superior experience and did what was suggested. This was a big mistake in our opinion. After a rewrite Hamish Ross resurfaced and possibly with a greater influence on the story ine.

He was born to a ‘Hellfire and Brimstone’, dour, Scottish minister and his cold-hearted, strict wife. She despised her brute of a husband and abhorred the weekly rituals he subjected her to which resulted in the birth of their son.

During the early years Hamish was discouraged from with other children who tormented the strange little boy at every opportunity. He was completely ostracised and grew into a lonely, sad, little boy. As the Jesuits say “give me the boy till he’s seven and I will show you the man.” This was certainly the case with Hamish Ross.

At the age of twelve he left the confines of his island home to attend school on the mainland, as did all the other children. Having spent most of his early years on his own he didn’t suffer homesickness like the other kids. He took great pleasure in extracting revenge on his tormentors.

Despite his father’s insistence that he enter the ministry Hamish had very different ideas and at the age of eighteen, against his parents wishes, enrolled in Police College.

College life was not what the young man expected, once again he became the butt of his classmates’ jokes. He was left out at every opportunity and it was at this time Hamish began hearing “The Voices” and the murders began.

Synopsis
From the authors of the bestselling Coyle Trilogy comes a fantastic new title.

Danube Street tells the tale of notorious Madame, Stella Gold, and her mission to turn the infamous number 17 Danube St into Edinburgh’s most exclusive brothel.

The house, situated in one of Edinburgh’s most exclusive streets, was known the length and breadth of the country; a magnet for red-blooded males, single or otherwise. Danube Street was always the first port of call when Merchant or Naval ships docked in Leith, and was the attraction, never to be missed by visiting clergymen of every denomination.

Stella Gold began life far from the bright lights of the city. Born Agnes McLeod, she was reared in the wilds of Ayrshire. The only daughter of a tenant farmer, she endured a harsh, rugged upbringing. Now, although the darling of Edinburgh’s glitterati, she finds herself the victim of a vendetta by the city’s most dangerous and violent criminal brothers,and a corrupt Chief of Police.

Survival was a constant challenge which Stella thought she had under control. How wrong could she be?

Guest Post

Hamish Ross

There are many complex characters in Danube Street and none more so than Hamish Ross. Both of us agree he is one of the most interesting.

On completion of the first draft we were advised to all but write him out. He was considered incidental to the plot and his background story totally unnecessary.

As two fairly novice authors we bowed to more superior experience and did what was suggested. This was a big mistake in our opinion. After a rewrite Hamish Ross resurfaced and possibly with a greater influence on the story ine.

He was born to a ‘Hellfire and Brimstone’, dour, Scottish minister and his cold-hearted, strict wife. She despised her brute of a husband and abhorred the weekly rituals he subjected her to which resulted in the birth of their son.

During the early years Hamish was discouraged from with other children who tormented the strange little boy at every opportunity. He was completely ostracised and grew into a lonely, sad, little boy. As the Jesuits say “give me the boy till he’s seven and I will show you the man.” This was certainly the case with Hamish Ross.

At the age of twelve he left the confines of his island home to attend school on the mainland, as did all the other children. Having spent most of his early years on his own he didn’t suffer homesickness like the other kids. He took great pleasure in extracting revenge on his tormentors.

Despite his father’s insistence that he enter the ministry Hamish had very different ideas and at the age of eighteen, against his parents wishes, enrolled in Police College.

College life was not what the young man expected, once again he became the butt of his classmates’ jokes. He was left out at every opportunity and it was at this time Hamish began hearing “The Voices” and the murders began.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.